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Grapes - Did you know?
Saturday, July 14, 2018
  By: Kingsdale Animal Hospital  In: Pet Health

Grapes - Did you know?

Everyone loves to give their dogs treats. Most fruits and vegetables are great treats for pets as they are crunchy, sweet, and healthy! However, many dog owners are unaware of the potential toxicity that grapes and raisins pose for dogs. Raisins, sultanas (light brown seedless raisins) and Zante currants are grapes that have been dried in the sun. Ingestion of grapes or raisins can cause acute kidney failure in dogs. It also includes the ingestion of raisins inside trail mix, granola bars, and baby food. It is unknown whether grape juice or wine has the potential to cause toxicity. The exact cause of the toxicity is unknown but research suggests that the toxin is a water soluble compound that may be located in the flesh or skin of the fruit. Anecdotal reports also suggest that not all dogs can be affected by grape or raisin toxicity. However, for dogs that are susceptible, even one grape or raisin can lead to kidney failure. Any age, sex, or breed may be susceptible to toxicity. Unlike most toxins that are dose-dependent in dose, grape toxicity is not. Therefore it is strongly recommended never to feed dogs any grapes or raisins.


If you notice that your dog has ingested a grape or raisin recently, we strongly recommend that you give us or your local emergency clinic a call. The best preventative treatment is to induce vomiting to ensure that the grape or raisin does not remain in their system and cause problems. We may then administer a gastrointestinal decontaminating agent to further aid in the prevention of kidney disease. Depending on the case, some dogs require bloodwork and/or intravenous fluids to further support their kidneys. Signs of kidney failure in dogs may begin within a few hours after ingestion and include vomiting, diarrhea, inappetance, dehydration, abdominal pain, lethargy, and excess drooling. Secondary signs that occur in the following days include excessive drinking and peeing, stumbling, weakness, and trembling. As the kidney injury progresses, the amount of urine produced actually decreases as the kidneys shut down.


Although grape toxicity has not been reported in other species, it is recommended to avoid feeding these fruits to any pet, including cats and ferrets.



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